Test drive for Mercedes-Benz EQC 400, its first electric car: No holding back

The Mercedes-Benz EQC 400 4Matic will be added to nine showroom floors around Australia this coming Monday, and to give you a taste of the German car maker’s first foray into electric mobility we were invited to experience and review the vehicle in its debut Australian drive day. There’s a well known saying: you get what you pay for. And to put it frankly, with a Mercedes-Benz you certainly do pay: In this case it $137,900 before on-road costs, but this all-electric SUV offers all the bells and whistles, even if you do need to pay extra for some. The EQC 400 is styled with the signature Mercedes-Benz high-end AMG brand, and is available in 7 standard colours as well as three “designo” extras. We take the brilliant blue with the standard but comfortable grey interior. Comfort and spaciousness have been first and foremost on the minds of the EQC 400 designers in the interior, ensuring the first experience of the EQC 400 has all the hallmarks of the usual Mercedes-Benz luxury. And the company credited with the invention of the internal combustion engine, is also keen to underpin the environmental credentials of the EQC 400 with a range of internal initiatives including upholstery ...

FILE – In this March 13, 2018 file photo VW group CEO Matthias Mueller attends the

FILE – In this March 13, 2018 file photo VW group CEO Matthias Mueller attends the annual media … [+] conference of the Volkswagen group in Berlin, Germany. He was replaced, in the wake of VW’s “diesel dupe” scandal. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber,file) In a post a few months ago, I lamented the way some companies now live in an ethical gray zone where they are willing to betray their customers—and other stakeholders—in the pursuit of profit. I singled out Volkswagen for its “diesel dupe” scandal. VW installed covert software that enabled its vehicles to evade emissions standards. The software detected when the car was being tested for emissions and ramped up its system to pass the test. It fooled everyone while the test was being done and then the cars went back to violating emissions limits on the road.  Why this happened is sadly human and absurd. A recent pair of articles from the New York Times lays out details about how the company tried to fool regulators and car buyers in order to surpass Toyota as the world’s largest auto-maker. It wanted to be the biggest, without being the best. But it was behind schedule on the creation of new diesel techno...