Tinder, OKCupid, Grindr And Other Apps Share Personal Data With Advertisers : NPR

Dating apps, including Tinder, give sensitive information about users to marketing companies, according to a Norwegian study released Tuesday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption Dating apps, including Tinder, give sensitive information about users to marketing companies, according to a Norwegian study released Tuesday. A group of civil rights and consumer groups is urging federal and state regulators to examine a number of mobile apps, including popular dating apps Grindr, Tinder and OKCupid for allegedly sharing personal information with advertising companies. The push by the privacy rights coalition follows a report published on Tuesday by the Norwegian Consumer Council that found 10 apps collect sensitive information including a user’s exact location, sexual orientation, religious and political beliefs, drug use and other information and then transmit the personal data to at least 135 different third-party companies. The data harvesting, according to the Norwegian government agency, appears to violate the European Union’s rules intended to protect people’s online data, known as the General Data Protection Regulation. In the U.S., consumer groups are equal...

Multiple presidential candidates seeking the Democratic nomination were once viewed as heirs to Barack Obama’s legacy.

Multiple presidential candidates seeking the Democratic nomination were once viewed as heirs to Barack Obama’s legacy. Candidates such as Sen. Kamala D. Harris, former housing secretary Julián Castro and Sen. Cory Booker all broke ceilings in their careers, have exceptional academic pedigrees and offer an inspiring narrative to embody their own versions of the American Dream in ways that some found reminiscent of the country’s first black president. But none of those candidates appear to have the same appeal as Obama did in his presidential races. All are attracting 5 percent or less of the electorate in the most recent national polls. And these candidates are even struggling to get significant of support from black and Latino voters, groups that helped propel Obama to his historic presidency. But former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick, his state’s first black elected governor, seems to think he can do better. After initially deciding not to run months ago, the Democrat entered the presidential contest Thursday aiming to build “a better, more sustainable, more inclusive American Dream.” “I admire and respect the candidates in the Democratic field. They bring a richness of ...